Coming home to Sumac camp

I arrived at camp late last night and, after saying hello to the amazing crew who have been here for the weekend, I headed straight up a giant eucalyptus tree which is situated right on the road line and where we have set up a tree-sit platform. Being back in the forest after being away is always so emotional, grounding, and beautiful. Whenever I walk into these ancient Tarkine forests I feel like I’m coming home.

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Myrtles and moss

Wow, what a very busy week at the Sumac defenders camp. We had around 14 interstate visitors, from Victoria, Adelaide and NSW, call in over four days to see what was going on show support. The signs at the entrance of the road are working, inviting guests to call in and have a cuppa. One young couple did the short 45min return walk to the little creek. As we stood on the edge of the destruction, the entrance to the rainforest, she burst into tears. The thought of this forest being clear felled was too overwhelming. Every visitor has been blown away by the size of the trees and the beauty of the Sumac forest and the waste that this industry leaves behind on the ground.

 

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Sleeping in the trees

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Rigging a sleeping platform in the Sumac rainforest.

Photo by Deb Hunter

 

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Like water for the soul

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The light is cool and green – I could almost be under water.

Water - I can hear it.

 

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Life's cycle

I have camped two nights at the Sumac road blockade now and observed the contrast of the burnt wastage of a clear fell and the rich, old, wise and abundant forest just a short walk away. 

I have observed the beauty of how life keeps on overtaking death. And how it’s all part of the same cycle. That nothing ever truly dies. 

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Called to takayna

As we journey in I start to see the wounding. We stop at the frontier. We sleep and gather on wounded land. I’m with a tribe of warriors.

I feel sad to my core. The forest calls me, swallows me up in its green. I walk gently and slowly with my heavy grief down to the bubbling creek.

 

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We are peacefully occupying threatened forests in ancient forests in Tasmania’s takayna / Tarkine.  These Gondwanan rainforests and tall eucalyptus forests are threatened by a new logging road this Spring / Summer. 

Located south-west of the popular and iconic Sumac Lookout overlooking the Arthur River. This very old Myrtle and Eucalyptus forest is an integral part of the Sumac catchment forest ecosystem, extending southward into core rainforest of the Tarkine and are habitat for the endangered Tasmanian Devil.  If logged the timber from these ancient forests will supply the controversial Malaysian timber company Ta Ann and the majority will be woodchipped.

 

 

Proposed logging of these ancient forests can be halted. We are calling on all federal and state political leaders, including Premier Hodgman and Opposition Leader Rebecca White, to commit to permanent protection of takayna / Tarkine in a National Park, listed for its World Heritage values and returned to Aboriginal ownership.  While we wait for political leadership, we will occupy these forests in a peaceful vigil aiming to prevent their loss to logging.

Join our blockade and help defend the ancient takayna / Tarkine rainforests from being flattened and burnt.

 

 

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Big Canopy Campout - Thank you!

A big thanks to everyone who made this great event happen.

 

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Logging threatens Tasmanian Devil habitat in takayna / Tarkine

Healthy Devils photographed in Tasmanian old growth forests threatened by logging this summer has prompted renewed calls for secure protection of takayna / Tarkine.

 

 

Photographs of two healthy Tasmanian Devils have been captured by conservation group Bob Brown Foundation, who have remote sensor wildlife cameras positioned along a proposed road that the Tasmanian Government wants to build for logging in an area of old growth forest.  Bob Brown Foundation is currently hosting a peaceful vigil camp in these forests, south west of the popular and iconic Sumac lookout over Arthur River.  Conservationists have been camped in these threatened forests for two weeks.

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Erik is Live from Sumac for the Big Canopy Campout

Live from takayna / Tarkine for The Big Canopy Campout in the Tasmanian threatened rainforests!

 

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